Colours of Autumn GBFD.

Gradually the colour green is draining away from some of the leaves in the garden. Underlying colours are starting to emerge as the garden prepares to have it’s final fling of the year. Usually we can rely on fantastic colours for about a month before they all blow away in a puff of wind, but for the last couple of days it has been a lot more than just a puff!  I’ll start in the front garden where the front border is now looking very colourful with the red leaves of Cornus alba sibirica Westonbirt , the gold of the silver birch Betula ermanii and the orange of the Prunus by the entrance.

Taken from the landing window, this view is so different now fom in the summer when the leaves are mainly green.

Taken from the landing window, this view is so different now from in the summer when the leaves are nearly all  green.

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Still flowering. GBBD October.

I managed to have a few minutes just walking round the garden the other day, so made the most of it and took some photos for GBBD. The garden is managing quite well without attention from me, the only problem is that the grass is getting so long without it’s normal haircut from the undergardener!

Aster Monch and Rudbeckia

Still flowering is Aster frickartii Monch, now in its third month and shows no sign of stopping. I must buy more for further down the border by the field.

Aster and Fuchsia

Fuchsia magellanica Alba with an unknown pale pink little aster. All the hardy fuchsias have been flowering since July, they certainly give value for money. The asters in the garden have been flowering for 6 weeks now, except for “Monch” which seems to be flowering for ever!

Colchicum and rose

The colchicums are coming to an end now, they have been rather battered by the wind and rain. Here this clump is supported by a small shrub rose.

Fuchsia Genii

Hardy Fuchsia Genii is here in front of the colchicums at the top right. I can also see some feverfew at the top left, this has been flowering all summer long, as long as I deadhead it, it carries on flowering.

Sedum

All the sedums are flowering and this one has a beautiful bumble bee visiting.

Physostegia

Physostegia is spreading a bit in the central island bed round the dead oak, I think I can move some of it to the border by the field. Here though, it contrast nicely with the Pittosporum Tom Thumb next to it.

Roses

Roses are still putting out new flowers, this is a small one in the front, sorry, can’t remember it’s name but I enjoy it’s flowers.

Penstemon Garnet with asters

In the bee and butterfly border, Asters are seeding themselves along the bed, I must remember to cut them back before they go to seed this year, the bees are enjoying them though so I will leave them a bit longer. Here they are partnered with Penstemon Garnet which has flowered all summer.

Asters with Sedum

More asters with Sedum this time, they go well together.

Toadstools

Not flowers but I had to include them. I think these toadstools are growing on the roots of the dead oak in the middle of the garden.

Geranium ?

I think this is Geranium procurens, it was bought as G. Anne Folkhard, but the way it spreads everywhere makes me think it was mislabelled. In the spring we pull out all that we can see, but when October comes, there it is again, waving at me from the plants that it has used as a support. The problem is that it roots from every node where it touches the soil, so this is one that I have to be severe with!

Viburnum bodnantense Dawn

I was amazed to see Viburnum bodnantense Dawn covered in flowers, I have never seen it flower so early, usually it is in the winter when these beautifully perfumed flowers start opening. The pale pink flowers look so pretty with the leaves that are changing colour before they fall.

Viburnum plicata Maresii

Another Viburnum which has its seasons mixed up is Viburnum plicatum Maresii. It has decided to flower again, just as the leaves are turning. The flowers are only half the size of the ones we had in the spring, but it still looks pretty.

Pampas grass

My Pampas grass at the back of the border by the field is getting squashed! Poor thing, I must rescue it from the pink flowered Spirea next to it which is now sending up suckers everywhere, even through the base of the pampas.

Hydrangea

New flowers are still being formed on a few hydrangeas, they look so fresh and summery against all the other hydrangea flowers, whose colours are now gently fading away.

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New flowers are still opening on the clumps of Rudbeckia in the garden. These have been flowering for such a long time now, they certainly earn their space.

Mophead Hydrangea

A mophead Hydrangea this time, putting out new flowers.

Honeysuckle berries

I think these are honeysuckle berries contrasting with the variegated leaves of a Prunus. The trouble is, I don’t remember planting a honeysuckle in this border!

Seedpods on Acer Osakazuki

The winged seedpods on Acer Osakazuki are as colourful as flowers so I felt I could include them here. I think I shall sow a few of them and see what comes up.

Iris foetidissima

The seeds of Iris foetidissima are more colourful than the flowers which are unfortunately rather drab. These get spread about the garden by the birds.

Liriope muscari

Flowering in the woodland where I quite often miss them, is Liriope muscari. These are little flowers, not berries, but I think I must find a place for them where I will be able to see them better.

Mahonia Charity

Mahonia Charity is now adding its lovely flowers to the garden and a slight perfume if the breeze is in the right direction.

Evening Primrose

Evening primrose is still providing pollen and nectar for the bees. I don’t cut these stems down until the spring as the seedheads bring in lots of goldfinches in the winter. These are such colourful birds, no wonder the collective noun is ” a charm of Goldfinches”.

Verbena bonariensis

Still flowering, still being visited by the bees, is Verbena bonariensis. How did we manage without it in the old days?!

Japanese anemone

Japanese anemones have had a good long flowering time, I see this one has some Brunnera Jack Frost at it’s feet, making a nice contrast.

Cyclamen hederifolium

Another plant that seems to have been flowering for months is Cyclamen hederifolium. They started flowering here at the end of July. This one has very pale leaves, almost silver.

Campanula poscharskyana

As long as the temperature stays above freezing, Campanula poscharskyana stays flowering, there always seem to be some flowers on each plant somewhere.

Polyanthus

One of a few  Polyanthus which never seem to stop flowering, they will keep on no matter what the weather throws at them during the winter.

Begonia

Some free Begonia corms were sent with one of my orders last spring. They aren’t something that I would normally buy, such huge double flowers, but they have filled the pots by the back door and certainly wake me up in the morning when I venture forth with the bird food!

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day is hosted once again by Carol at May Dreams Garden, many thanks Carol. Do pop over to visit her and see the flowers that are blooming around the world.

I must say a big “thank you” to all of you who left such lovely comments on my previous post, it is wonderful to have so much support. I have had the undergardener back home for a week now, it’s wonderful to have him back once more and he is looking remarkably well. He hasn’t lost his sense of humour , thank goodness, but now we are just waiting for the results of his biopsy. We have been told that he will then face a spell of radio therapy to shrink the growth, before they remove it. We are taking one day at a time at the moment, enjoying some little treats each day, gardening and housework will just have to wait!

 

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Leave of absence.

 

Asters and sedum

I’m afraid I will be missing for a while as the undergardener is now in hospital, so the garden and my blog will have to take a backseat.

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Changing foliage in September GBFD.

The present sunny spell is lasting quite a long time. We had torrential rain last Friday which perked all the plants up, and now we are back to sunny days once more. September so far has been a very warm, sunny month.  I’m not complaining,  but we do need more rain to keep the garden happy. When looking round the garden for foliage to photograph this morning, nothing was jumping out at me, it is too soon for the autumn tints where we live, only one or two plants have started to change, most will be photographed for next month.

Cornus  sibirica Westonbirt

The red stemmed Cornus along the driveway in the front have just started to change colour, only a few leaves at the moment, but the rest will follow soon until they are all a pink/purple colour next month.

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Berry Delicious.

At this time of year,  berries are are covering some of the shrubs and trees in the garden and becoming more and more obvious as they change colour. If only the birds would leave them until the cold weather of winter kills off the insects, then they would have plenty of food to see them through a cold spell. Unfortunately they are like children in a sweetie shop, hopping from one bush to another, trying them all.

Sloes, Blackthorn

Lots of sloes on the blackthorn at the top of the garden,  sloe gin anyone ?

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Still flowering for GBBD September.

September is halfway through already, it is darker in the evenings and there is definitely an air of autumn about the garden. Misty mornings which then turn into beautiful sunny days are the norm at the moment and will be for a while longer if the weather forecasters are to be believed. Some flowers are having a last mad fling before the onset of cooler weather, some are flowering again , but smaller, where they were cut back earlier. Some though are just starting to flower,  as now is their time to be the centre of attention.

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Lunch and a garden in Somerset.

We met up with a friend the other week who was making her way home from Dorset to Wales, at Margery Fish’s garden at East Lambrook Manor in Somerset. There is also a good pub opposite, The Rose and Crown, which is ideal for lunch. I think the pub must do very well from all the visitors to the garden, especially in February as the garden is famous for it’s snowdrops. One year we went and got the last available table, so its best to book ahead.

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Back to School.

The Rotary Club in Exeter have promised a school in the city that they will redesign and plant their little garden, with wildlife in mind. The undergardener is a member of the Rotary Club in Exeter and I was roped in to give them some ideas on design and to tell them which plants would be suitable. When I first saw it, my heart sank somewhat as there had been a garden on the site but it was completely over run with weeds and seedling trees.

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August EOM View.

Looking back over last month’s EOM view, there has been a subtle change in the way the garden looks, it is a much softer light which makes everything appear more mellow with hints of yellow to be seen everywhere, summer is slipping away. I have taken my usual wander round the garden but there don’t seem to be any highlights this month. I will have to go searching for some for you, I just hope I can find some!

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Is Summer slipping away? GBFD August.

Even though we don’t want to think about it, the evidence is there for all to see. The fresh green colours of spring and summer are gradually being overtaken by a few colours of autumn. This is a white peony which I really must plant soon, it has been in a pot for far too long.

Paeony foliage

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