Andrew’s Corner.

Normally we stay at home when it’s a Bank Holiday, as the roads can get so busy down here in Devon at holiday time and driving isn’t a pleasure any more. However, today we found that a garden was open for the National Garden Scheme and it wasn’t too far away, so off we went. Round the north side of Dartmoor, we followed the yellow signs and soon found the garden called Andrew’s Corner.

Garden house, Andrew's corner.

Garden house, Andrew’s corner.

In the side garden was the first of a few garden buildings, with my friend Aktinidia kolomicta in the corner. This must be how it grows when not clipped round a window!

Bug hotel.

Bug hotel.

We soon came upon a bug hotel, tucked into a corner. I would think that little bugs etc. would be nice and cosy in here.

Sculpture with Claytonia.

Sculpture with Claytonia.

I felt very much at home in this garden with its sculptures and familiar plants. This young lady is kneeling in a sea of Claytonia, which I have in the woodland.

Sculpture with bluebells.

Sculpture with bluebells.

This little person found some bluebells to dance round.

Rhododendron and pond.

Rhododendron and pond.

There were lots of rhododendrons and azaleas. Also there were lots of acers, so the garden would be worth visiting in the autumn for autumn tints. The garden is open in the autumn with the proceeds going to Little Bridge House, the hospice for children in the SW of England.

Meconopsis.

Meconopsis.

There were quite a few Meconopsis scattered round the different beds, they were all  so beautiful, but we thought that they would have made a better impact if they had all been together. Even so, they have more than I do, this year only one of mine survived the winter and that one is nowhere near flowering yet.

Pond.

Pond.

The garden was very sheltered with lots of very tall trees acting as shelter belts round the garden. Being on the northern edge of Dartmoor they must have very strong winds especially in the winter and without the shelter of the trees, the shrubs would suffer dreadfully.

Bluebells with Welsh Poppy.

Bluebells with Welsh Poppy.

There were lots of bluebells and Meconopsis Cambria everywhere, it all seemed so familiar.

More bluebells.

More bluebells.

Very relaxed planting.

Dartmoor.

Dartmoor.

The vegetable garden is at the bottom of the slope and just over the fence is Dartmoor which can be very bleak and wet at certain times of the year, but when the weather is behaving itself, it is a wonderful place to be.

Timber!

Timber!

This was a massive tree, I wonder what I could have carved out of it?! It would have been nice to carve something in situ, before the final cut was made, it would then have had Dartmoor as a backdrop.

Resting place.

Resting place.

Thank goodness there were lots of seats dotted round the garden, my muscles were protesting at the uneven ground so I was very grateful for a sit down.

Magnolia Wilsonii

Magnolia Wilsonii

There were also quite a few Magnolia trees, this one is wilsonii, the flowers are rather beautiful don’t you think?

.Sunny glade

Sunny glade

The flowers sparkled in the sunny glades, but all the time we were wandering round, there was the most beautiful perfume from the deciduous azaleas.

Sorbaria sorbifolia sem.

Sorbaria sorbifolia sem.

I spotted this lovely little shrub and thought the foliage was fascinating. I showed my photo to Andrew who identified it for me. It is a dwarf shrub and this one was only about 3 ft high, I’m sure I could squeeze one in somewhere!

Maple leaves.

Maple leaves.

I also showed Andrew this photo as the leaves looked like ivy, but red ivy?!  They were suckers from one of the large Maple trees, the suckers, when I looked, were coming up everywhere, I think I’ll pass on this one.

Rhodohypoxis.

Rhodohypoxis.

There were quite a few alpine troughs near the house, this one for Rhodohypoxis,

Alpines.

Alpines.

and this one with a collection of mixed alpines.

Near the pond.

Near the pond.

We enjoyed a lovely cup of tea before we left, and also the most scrumptious piece of Lemon Drizzle Cake, a garden visit wouldn’t be the same without refreshments!

We thoroughly enjoyed our visit and I hope we will remember to go back in the autumn to see the autumn tints, which must be fantastic as they have so many beautiful acers.

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Lovely new foliage everywhere.GBFD May

It’s not just that we have wonderfully coloured flowers everywhere in May, the foliage isn’t bad either!  Everywhere is still looking so fresh and the leaves are every bit as good as the flowers in some cases. Quite a few weeds have crept into the photos, but my last post explains why there hasn’t been time to eradicate them!

Candelabra Primula

Candelabra Primula

The foliage of the candelabra primulas in the bog garden, is almost like a lettuce! At this time of year they are so fresh and plumped up with all the rain we have had over the past couple of weeks.

Rogersia.

Rogersia.

I love the early foliage of the Rogersia in the bog. It looks so metallic with a bronze/copper colour to the leaves when they first appear, they eventually go green unfortunately, I wish they would stay like this.

Astilbe and lemon balm.

Astilbe and lemon balm.

Astilbe foliage a bit further along the border is contrasting nicely with the lemon balm behind it. The lemon balm has put itself there without any help from me – do I let it stay or do I weed it out, as it seeds everywhere round the garden?

Hosta Snowden.

Hosta Snowden.

All the hostas are now unfurling their beautiful leaves, this one is Hosta Snowden. It is surrounded by primulas but I can see a buttercup has sneaked into the photo! One day I will have everywhere weeded!

Hostas and ferns.

Hostas and ferns.

Astible, ferns and hostas go so well together. This is further along in the bog, the other side of the little path which cuts through the rhododendron bed to make weeding easier. The hosta in front is H. Halcyon and the fern is my favourite Matteuccia struthiopteris.

Hosta, heuchera and stipa.

Hosta, heuchera and stipa.

Moving round to the bed round the alpine scree, there is  Heuchera  Marmalade, Hosta Devon Blue and what was Stipa arundinacea but is now I believe, Anemiathele lessioniana!

Horse Chestnut

Horse Chestnut

In the woodland is the new growth on an old stump of Horse Chestnut, at the moment it looks very pretty, but if I want the stump to die, I will have to remove them all. A shame I know, but I really don’t need yet another Horse Chestnut tree!

Heuchera in the woodland.

Heuchera in the woodland.

Heuchera Key Lime Pie is looking very bright in the woodland with its new foliage, it is in front of what was Dicentra spectabilis but now I think Lamprocapnmos spectabilis.

Actinidia kolomicta

Actinidia kolomikta

Climbing the wall of the house is Actinidia kolomikta and its leaves are now showing their different colours, with leaves like these you wouldn’t think the plant would need flowers, but it has tiny white ones which hang down under the leaves.

Actinidia kolomikta

Actinidia kolomikta

The best  view of it though, is from the balcony where you can see it from on top.

Acanthus mollis.

Acanthus mollis.

Acanthus mollis didn’t die down in the winter so the leaves are still looking beautiful. I have to keep an eye on this as it is taking over the area just by the pond, a firm hand will be needed.

Japanese painted fern and golden grass.

Japanese painted fern and golden grass.

In the bog garden Athyrium niponicum Pictum is contrasting with a golden sedge.

Matteuccia struthiopteris.

Matteuccia struthiopteris.

Matteuccia struthiopteris is catching the morning light at the end of the bog garden.

Hosta, asilbe and Lysimachia.

Hosta, asilbe and Lysimachia.

A hosta given by a friend with Astilbes either side and one stem of Lysimachia punctata Fireworks. This stem and roots will be removed , the Lysimachia is a thug, it puts out runners and comes up 20 or 30 ft away!

Lysimachia punctata  Firecracker

Lysimachia punctata Firecracker

This is the original plant, contrasting with the Euonymus behind it, I just wish it were better behaved, it relishes my heavy clay soil! The ones in the background have been pulled out, but how long will it be before they pop up again!

Solomon's seal,Hart's tongue fern and Epimedium.

Solomon’s seal,Hart’s tongue fern and Epimedium.

This little group always pleases me, but I think a bit of editing is needed. This is the path through the rhrododendron bed and in some places it is getting difficult to walk through to do the weeding.

Brunnera with Heuchera foliage

Brunnera with Hemerocallis  foliage

In the bed round the scree, Brunnera Jack Frost is sheltering under the arching leaves of Hemerocallis.

Heuchera and two different ferns

Heuchera and two different ferns

Just behind the scree, in the shade of Prunus Kojo-no-mai, is a Heuchera Vienna with the fern Athyrium nipponicum pictum either side, then at the front is Athyrium Frizelliae, the tatting fern. Yes, I can see the dandelion leaf too, it will be dealt with!

Cotinus

Cotinus

Catching the setting sunlight in the back garden is a Cotinus bush.

Cardoon

Cardoon

I’m so glad I managed to rescue my Cardoon which was being swamped by the hedge behind it, the leaves now make a real statement in this border by the field. The foliage is a bit messy by the time it flowers, I have read that by cutting off the flower spikes, the foliage should stay looking nice, but can I bring myself to cut the huge thistle heads off, I don’t know, I might just try it this year and see what happens!

Acer palmatum Shindeshojo

Acer palmatum Shindeshojo

I couldn’t finish a foliage day without including my new Acer palmatum Shindeshojo. The spring colour is as it is now, it then turns green for the summer and then to red/orange for the autumn. I haven’t planted it yet but have just the space for it where it will fit nicely with the planting around it.

Bog garden.

Bog garden.

I will finish with a view of the bog garden, there are just a few flowers so far, but there is also plenty of interest from the different foliage. Just as the woodland was the first part of the garden that I went to each day from Jan to April, this is where I will be heading first, for the next few months.

Thanks to Christina at My Hesperides Garden for encouraging us to value the foliage in our gardens and for hosting this meme each month. Please pay her a visit to see more interesting foliage around the world.

 

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At last, we can stay at home!

Or, we can go out whenever we like!  For the last eight weeks the undergardener and I, have been going to the hospital in Exeter every day for radio therapy treatment for his prostate cancer. Last Friday was his last session, thank goodness, we now just have to wait 8 weeks to see the Oncologist to make sure that everything is ok once more. Hormone therapy will continue for another 3 yrs.

Looking through the rhododendron bed to the back garden.

Looking through the rhododendron bed to the back garden.

Only the essentials in the garden and house have been done, so it will be good to get out into the garden once more and have a good session clearing the weeds. Blogging has had to take a back seat I’m afraid, I am way behind with reading your posts and leaving comments, but I have tried to write a few posts so that it wasn’t obvious that we weren’t at home.

Looking back the other way through to the circular lawn with the bog garden.

Looking back the other way through to the circular lawn with the bog garden.

My children have been telling me for a while, that some people who have announced to the world through their blogs, Twitter or Facebook that they are  away on holiday, are finding that if they have been burgled while away, their insurance companies are now refusing to pay out. Obviously we didn’t want this to happen to us, hence trying to keep the blog as near to the norm  as possible, but I now have a lot of catching up to do. I don’t for one moment think that burglars are interested in my gardening blog, but you never can tell, better to be safe than sorry.

The view from the scree across the back lawn to the archway into the woodland.

The view from the scree across the back lawn to the archway into the woodland.

It will be so good not to have to struggle every day (except weekends) to find a parking space at the hospital. Oncology patients are given a free parking permit so at least we didn’t have to pay (£2.50), but could hardly ever find a space in the oncology car park, sometimes having to go round and round in the main carpark before spotting a space.

View of back garden with Dicentra

View of back garden with Dicentra

The department itself is a wonderfully cheerful place with everyone laughing and joking about their various bits and pieces receiving treatment, you wouldn’t think any of them were seriously ill!

View across the circular lawn.

View across the circular lawn.

Some of you may remember that 4 weeks ago I wrote a post called “Playing Truant”, I’m sure you thought we were playing truant from the garden. We were actually playing truant from the hospital, the undergardener was given a rest day half way through his treatment, to go out and enjoy himself, which we certainly did. I think we ought to celebrate the end of his treatment sometime don’t you?!

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Blooming Maytime. GBBD.

May is the time when the garden goes into overdrive, everything seems to want to bloom at the same time, I just wish I could press a pause button and slow everything down a bit. Rhododendrons and Azaleas are now flowering with the wonderful perfume of the deciduous azaleas wafting around the garden.

Rhododendron Fantastica

Rhododendron Fantastica

This Rhodo is flowering in the woodland and we can see it from the house. This is a very reliable one, flowering every year with just the occasional bucket of water when we have a drought, yes we do sometimes have droughts !

Rhododendron luteum

Rhododendron luteum

Deciduous Rhododendron luteum is in the bed round the dead oak and has the most delightful perfume. This is still a fairly young bush, so is only small at the moment, but in 10 yrs time the perfume should be amazing!

Rhododendron Persil

Rhododendron Persil

Next to it in the dead oak bed is another deciduous azalea, R. Persil. This too has the same beautiful perfume as its neighbour and they both have wonderful autumn tints too, they both certainly earn their space.

Rhododendron bed

Rhododendron bed

The rhododendron bed opposite the back door, has quite a few R. shrubs, but it was such a long time ago that I planted it, I have forgotten this ones name! In spite of that, it always puts on a good show at this time of year and is always the first one in this bed to flower, the others will follow soon.

Rhododendron Curlew

Rhododendron Curlew

Going to the other extreme is evergreen R. Curlew. This one is tiny, at the moment only about 6 inches tall, it will eventually get to 1 foot tall! I think I should maybe move it to be with its friends across the lawn, at the moment it is in the bed which wraps round the alpine scree and gets forgotten where it is.

Evergreen Azalea

Evergreen Azalea

The evergreen azalea in the back garden draws the eye wherever you are. This one was here before we were, so no name I’m afraid.

Viburnum plicatum Maresii with R. Homebush

Viburnum plicatum Maresii with R. Homebush

Also in the bed round the dead oak (I really must find a name for this bed!) is Viburnum plicatum Maresii which holds its flowers along horizontal branches and looks so pretty. In front, but not quite in flower yet is the pink of deciduous Azalea Homebush which, when open , has the most beautiful perfume.

Weigela Victoria ?

Weigela Victoria ?

I have a feeling that this Weigela is called Victoria but can’t find it in my encyclopedia, can anyone help please? Anyway, it has purple leaves which form a nice background to the pink/purple flowers.

Choysia ternata

Choysia ternata

Choysia ternata is flowering away in the corner of the back garden. This shrubs always seems to have two seasons of flowers as it repeats towards the end of the summer. May is certainly the month for flowering shrubs!

The bog garden awakes!

The bog garden awakes!

The bog garden is now waking up ready to display all its candelabra primulas, astilbes, hostas, ferns and other bog plants.

Candelabra primula

Candelabra primula

Once all the candelabra primulas get into flowering mode, this area should be a rainbow of colour, so far there are just a few flowering.

Candelabra primulas

Candelabra primulas

I planted all the primulas as a rainbow, with their colours in the right order. I think nature has been at work and mixed them up!

Camassias

Camassias

These Camassias are in the front border by the drive, but I think they might be happier in the drier end of the bog garden, must make a note to move them.

Clematis montana

Clematis montana

I photographed my Clematis montana too soon when I did my recent post about it. It now has far more flowers open and is looking like a pale pink waterfall cascading down the oak tree.

I think May is such a wonderful month as far as flowers go, climbers, shrubs, bulbs and perennials are flowering with more and more coming each day. Thanks must go to Carol at May Dreams Gardens for encouraging us to record our flowers on the 15th of each month. Do pay her a visit to see flowers from around the world.

 

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A slow, slow, worms eye view.

It was the under gardener’s birthday last week and we went to Cornwall for the day looking for steam trains. After having a ride behind one we made our way to the Plume of Feathers Inn where we had a  wonderful lunch. We then just happened to be in the area and stopped at  the Duchy of Cornwall’s Nursery! For those outside the UK, Prince Charles is the Duke of Cornwall and profits from the nursery go to his charities.

Rhododendron

Rhododendron

There were some lovely plants for sale, lots of these rather expensive large rhododendrons,

Rhododendron

Rhododendron

No, these were too heavy to jump into the boot of the car!

Duchy of Cornwall nursery

Duchy of Cornwall nursery

Some of these did though.

Alpine plants

Alpine plants

Everywhere was very neat and tidy and the nursery has changed a lot since we last visited, with a new shop and restaurant to tempt you to part with more money!

My choice

My choice

These are the ones that came home with me, I really mustn’t leave them sitting in their pots, I must start planting!

Slow worm

Slow worm

When we got home I had a wander round the garden, as one does, and when coming back out of the woodland I thought I saw a twig on the grass, but it was moving!

Slow worm

Slow worm

It was about 18inches long and was a slow worm, Anguis fragilis. It is actually a legless lizard, not a snake or a worm and it is quite a few years since I have seen one in the garden. It differs from a snake in that it has eyelids and ear openings.

Slow worm

Slow worm

I think it was pretending to be dead while I photographed it, I had the camera with its macro lens for photographing flowers, so the camera was only 2 inches from it. Of course it had slipped away while I ran into the house to get the under gardener, he had to make do with the photos! Considering everything, we both had a lovely day out.

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Scaling the heights.

My pink Clematis montana is quietly scrambling up one of the ancient oaks at the side of the garden,  at the back of the rhododendron bed. For years I thought it had died because the first year after planting I kept forgetting to water it and there was nothing to be seen.

Clematis montana

Clematis montana

I had planted it on the side of the tree facing the  house, thinking we would then be able to see it from the kitchen and dining room.

Clematis montana

Clematis montana

It had other plans. Unknown to me, it was slowly climbing the other side of the oak which faces the morning sun!

Clematis montana

Clematis montana

It came as quite a surprise when I suddenly found pink flowers half way up the oak tree.

Clematis montana

Clematis montana

Now it is well over 2/3rds of the way up before it tumbles down again, making a wonderful waterfall of pink blossom.

Clematis stem

Clematis stem

The stem which was so thin and delicate when it was planted, is now as thick as my wrist, I think it is a permanent fixture now. The oak must be well over 200 yrs old if not 300, going on the size of the trunk, and it needs something this huge and solid to hold all the weight of the clematis.

Clematis montana

Clematis montana

I wonder if the clematis will eventually scramble up to the very top of the tree,  it has certainly climbed much further than I had hoped when I planted it about 15 yrs ago. The will to live must be very strong in some plants, for my clematis to have succeeded in spite of my neglect!

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P.I.P.s in May.

May is the month for ebullient flowering,  the garden will be overflowing with flowers that are definitely OTT!  The Pips in question are the flamboyant Peonies, Iris and Poppies and they are joined by Rhododendrons and Azaleas, but they will be in a separate post. Some of these flowers don’t last very long, but that doesn’t matter, they add their gorgeousness to the garden when the spring bulbs are dying back and before the summer perennials start flowering  and fill the gap beautifully.

Peony mlokosewitschii

Peony mlokosewitschii

Peony mlokosewitschii is the first of the herbaceous peonies to flower here.

Peony mlokosewitschii

Peony mlokosewitschii

The colour of the petals is such a beautiful pale yellow, they close up to try and protect the pollen from the rain that is falling.

Peony mlokosewitschii

Peony mlokosewitschii

But when the sun comes out, they open up waiting for any passing bee.

Peony mlokosewitschii

Peony mlokosewitschii

I think I need to give Molly the Witch some fertiliser, she had far more flowers last year.

Tree peony

Tree peony

The other peony that is looking beautiful at the moment is a red Tree Peony.

Tree peony

Tree peony

Just bought as a red one, so no name I’m afraid. The colour of the flower is picked up in the leaves.

Tree peony

Tree peony

The bees love to wallow in the pollen. In spite of being called a tree peony, it is only the height of the herbaceous peonies. It’s main stem doesn’t die down in the winter though, it stays all through the winter.

Dwarf bearded Iris

Dwarf bearded Iris

Iris reticulata are the first iris to flower here, usually in January, but now is the turn of the dwarf bearded Iris.

Dwarf bearded Iris

Dwarf bearded Iris

This one was left over at the end of a plant sale at church, so I took pity on it and brought it home.

Dwarf bearded Iris

Dwarf bearded Iris

I’m so glad that I did, it has the most beautiful perfume!

Dwarf bearded Iris

Dwarf bearded Iris

It seems very happy on the alpine scree, so I think I must buy some more for here as the drainage is the best in the garden.

Meconopsis cambrica

Meconopsis cambrica

The only poppy I have flowering at the moment is the Welsh poppy, Meconopsis Cambrica. The Oriental poppies have lovely buds swelling but none are open at the moment, they won’t be long though. These flowers are in the front border by the drive, I sprinkled seed a couple of years ago and at last they have decided that they like it here.

Meconopsis Cambrica

Meconopsis Cambrica

The woodland seems to be the best place for these poppies, there isn’t any problem getting seed to germinate here.

Meconopsis Cambrica

Meconopsis Cambrica

They are also happy to be the understorey in the Rhododendron bed. I will be sprinkling more seed when it is ready. Some people consider the Welsh poppy to be a weed, but I can’t see that happening here, it is only growing where I have sprinkled the seed in previous years, it probably likes a lighter soil than I have. Soon we will have the gorgeous Oriental poppies flaunting all their blowsiness, they will certainly be in part 2!

 

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A mixed bag for April.

One morning when I got up, the light in the garden was so beautiful, I decided to take some photos from the balcony, before going down to get the breakfast ready.

The side garden.

The side garden.

The grass in the foreground, leads straight on to the circular lawn with the bog garden on the right and the pergola(where the white blossom is and the pink blossom on the large Bramley apple tree)  leading to the fruit and veggies at the top left. If you turn left at the top of the steps…..

Turning left .

Turning left .

…….the lawn sweeps round the back of the dead oak and up the side of the garden next to the fence by the field next door.

Turning right.

Turning right.

If you turn right, the lawn sweeps round to the back garden where the woodland can be seen through the arch way.

Front garden.

Front garden.

This photo of the front garden was taken through the landing window. The Cornus stems are still waiting for me to decide what I’m going to make from them, in the meantime they add a splash of red!

Sunlight.

Sunlight.

Wandering round this morning, the sunlight was filtering through to the bog garden where Matteuccia struthiopteris is spreading, I must watch it doesn’t spread too far.

Blue and yellow.

Blue and yellow.

I do like blue and yellow together. Here it is Forget-me-not and cowslip looking lovely together at the drier end of the bog garden.

More blue and yellow

More blue and yellow

Just a bit further along, the blue is from the bluebells that are just starting to flower, Hyacinthoides non scripta, the English bluebell, and the yellow is the grass, Bowles golden grass, Milium effusum Aureum.

Tree peony

Tree peony

In the border across the circular lawn, by the dead oak, is my first peony to flower. This tree peony was just bought as “Red”, so I’m afraid no name, in spite of being nameless, she is rather beautiful.

Rhododendron bed

Rhododendron bed

The bog garden gets drier as it gets nearer to the house and this is where the rhododendrons are. They are almost in flower, but not quite. The under planting is quite woodlandy here and where you can see spaces, there are hostas coming through.

Brunnera Jack Frost seedlings

Brunnera Jack Frost seedlings

Continuing round to the back garden I spotted some seedlings of Brunnera Jack Frost. One has come the same as its parent but the other is different, I must pot them on and plant them in the woodland.

Cotoneaster

Cotoneaster

Forming part of the hedge that divides the back garden from the woodland was a Cotoneaster, but what has happened, it is dead! How could it suddenly die I ask myself ? There is work here for someone, but I can replant with some camellias that are a bit squashed where they are at the moment.

Primroses

Primroses

The primroses this side of the ditch have seeded downhill without any help from me, I hope to get the other sides looking like this.

The woodland

The woodland

The fritillaries are over for another year, I am now waiting to harvest their seed. Now it is forget me nots, cowslips, primroses. claytonia, and honesty that are providing interest at the moment.

Honesty

Honesty

I grew the honesty last year from seed, I expected all the flowers to be mauve but half have turned out to be white which is rather nice. When I planted out the plugs, by pure chance they have come with all mauve flowers at the back and all white in front, it would have been better if they had been mixed I think, better next year!

Opposite view of the woodland.

Opposite view of the woodland.

The cowslips and forget me nots are spreading in the woodland, also the little pink Claytonia which is above the cowslips, an eye will have to be kept on them to make sure they don’t over run any little treasures that there are.

Meconopsis Cambrica

Meconopsis Cambrica

My first Welsh poppy to flower in the woodland, I do like the way they seed around without any help from me, but all I need now is to sprinkle some seed among the forget me nots and they would continue the blue and yellow theme for me!

Long view from the back garden through to the side garden.

Long view from the back garden through to the side garden.

The view from the back to the side is getting more colourful each day as more flowers open.

Abbu Hassan

Abu Hassan

In the border just outside the back door is Tulip Abu Hassan looking gorgeous with the sun shining through his petals.

I enjoyed my wander through the garden, no rain so far today, but the garden looks so much better than a week ago, it has really come to life and is now showing so much colour everywhere.

Thanks to Helen for hosting this monthly meme, do pay her a visit to see other gardens from round the world.

 

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Raindrops on roses.

At long last it is raining!  The garden and I are very happy because we have had at least a month without a drop of rain.

Yes, this is a case of raindrops on roses....but

Yes, this is a case of raindrops on roses….but

but I couldn't find a kitten, so a tulip will have to do instead.

…… I couldn’t find a kitten, so a tulip will have to do instead.

Hemerocallis and Brunnera Jack Frost

Wandering round the garden, between showers, I found raindrops on Hemerocallis with Brunnera Jack Frost

Heuchera collecting raindrops in the centre of the leaf.

Heuchera collecting raindrops in the centre of the leaf.

Euphorbia melliferra

I caught these on Euphorbia melliferra before they could slide off.

Raindrops on the honeysuckle over the arbour in the back garden.

Raindrops on the honeysuckle over the arbour in the back garden.

There is a raindrop hiding in the sedum on the alpine scree.

There is a raindrop hiding in the sedum on the alpine scree.

Raindrops on Aquilegia semiaquilegia on the scree.

Raindrops on Aquilegia semiaquilegia on the scree.

My last photo of a hellebore with raindrops before coming in as it was raining again!

My photo of a hellebore with raindrops before coming in as it was raining again!

What a difference it makes when the grass has just been cut. Everything is looking bright and perky after our rain showers.

What a difference it makes when the grass has just been cut. Everything is looking bright and perky after our showers.

We have more rain promised for tonight, the garden will be very pleased and so will I.  I miss it when we have such a long spell without any rain, most of my plants are ones that like a damp soil, but the last few weeks were so dry, some of then were beginning to look miserable!

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New shoots everywhere!

All the new shoots bursting out all over the garden are the subject of this month’s Garden Bloggers Foliage Day hosted by Christina at My Hesperides Garden. Everywhere I look, there are wonderful new leaves to grab my attention, so many different colours, shapes, sizes and textures.

Acer

Starting with the tall Acer in the back garden, the new leaves are a lovely pleated, bright green which contrast with the little pink flower buds that are showing already. This tree was here before we were, so I don’t know its full name, bu it turns a wonderful orangey/red in the autumn.

Acer Osakazuku

Acer Osakazuki is a little behind and is only just opening its buds where we can see the pink flower buds, the new leaves are all green. This tree turns the most vivid red in the autumn.

Matteuccia struthiopteris

Ferns are unfolding, this is Matteuccia struthiopteris, one of a few that I have planted in the ditch.

Heuchera

All the Heucheras are waking up and making new leaves, time to tidy away the old leaves!

Japanese painted fern

The Japanese painted fer, Athyrium niponicum Pictum, contrasts with everything around it, it has such beautiful fronds.

Hose Chestnut

Lovely new leaves of one of our horse chestnuts. The leaves are so thin and vulnerable at this stage, it is such a shame that by July they will have been infested with the moth larva that eats them from within and then they will be green with horrible brown blotches. The experts say it doesn’t damage the tree but each year the trees can’t photosynthesise properly, so I think they might become weaker and weaker, I really hope this isn’t the case. It has been noticed that blue tits are pecking the grubs out from the leaves, hopefully they will teach each other about this wonderful source of protein – a case of nature helping itself.

Pieris Forest Flame

Pieris Forest Flame with lovely red new leaves, who needs flowers when the new growth is as attractive as this?

Actinidinia Kolomikta

A cousin of the kiwi fruit, Actinidia kolomicta had beautifully coloured leaves. As they age they become more pink, they look lovely when both white and pink are on the leaves.

Roses

New growth on roses starts the rose season off early, all the new growth is beautiful, but they will soon turn green.

Berberis

All the berberis bushes in the garden are sporting their new leaves, which look so beautiful with the sun shining through them.

Mahonia seedling

Where has this Mahonia seedling come from? We have a bush  in the front garden, this seedling is about 30ft away in the back garden. It will have to be potted up as there isn’t room for it to develop where it now is.

Cynara cardunculus

The cardoon in the side border by the field (Cynara cardunculus) is growing nicely, getting better and better each year, it is recovering from being swamped by the hedge behind it.

Pittosporum Tom Thumb

Just starting to show new green growth is Pittosporum Tom Thumb. Soon the new growth will be a lot more noticeable before it finally turns dark maroon/brown and blends in with the older leaves.

Candelabra primula

The bog garden is waking up, all the candelabra primulas are starting to grow, it won’t be long before the rainbow of flowers start appearing. In the meantime I can enjoy the leaves getting bigger and bigger each day.

Iris

Also in the bog are clumps of our wild iris, Iris pseudacorus variegata. The leaves look lovely before they flower, when they revert to plain green.

Meconopsis Lingholm

This is the only Meconopsis Lingholm that has survived the winter, I don’t know why it is the only one, so I hope this one flowers and provides me with some seed for next year. Only 2 flowers had viable seed last year, all the other flower heads were filled with a very fine dust which is no use at all.

Epimedium

Epimedium have beautiful leaves, starting out with a purple flush to them.

Day lily and Welsh poppy

There are lots of clumps of Hemerocallis foliage, this one is accompanied by the welshpoppy, Meconopsis cambrica.

mixed foliage

Pulmonaria, Dicentra and Gallium odoratum mixing together. I will have to watch the Gallium as it spreads a lot. Somehow it has come to this bed from the woodland where it forms groundcover.

Brunnera Jack Frost

Brunnera Jack Frost is happy mixing with Hemerocallis on the left and Aquilegia on the right. The blue flower is a forget me not and not the Brunnera which has very similar flowers.

Blue conifer and Philadelphus Belle etoille

In the back garden are two contrasting shrubs, a blue conifer on the left and the yellow leaves of Philadelphus  coronarius aurius.

Asplenium

Rearing up like lots of baby cobras are the fronds of Asplenium scolopendrium, the hart’s tongue fern, I love the shapes they make!

Morning sun on the Amelanchier

I will leave you with early morning sun on the Amelanchier. The new leaves emerge bronze before turning green and then back to orange/red before falling in the autumn, my favourite small tree.

Thank you to Christina at My Hesperides Garden for hosting this monthly meme which encourages us to look more closely at the foliage in the garden, do pay her a visit and see lots of interesting foliage.

 

 

 

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